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January update.

01 Feb

The conventions over and it’s back to the shop, to my corner.

I finished up the convention with this piece on Veda.

Here are a few Photos from the convention, and of course some of the lovely ladies…lol.

Here are two CD’s I have been listening too, hope you like them!

Wanda Jackson

“It’s an exciting time to be Wanda Jackson,” Austin’s American-Statesman declared in October on the eve of Jackson’s 73rd birthday bash at the Continental Club there. The undisputed Queen of Rockabilly – a touring powerhouse for more than 50 years – is releasing her debut disc for Third Man/Nonesuch Records, the aptly titled The Party Ain’t Over.
This collection of vintage and contemporary covers was produced by fan and new-found friend Jack White at his Nashville studio and recorded with a late-night honky-tonk feel by members of My Morning Jacket, the Raconteurs, and Dead Weather, among others. The White-curated lineup of tunes, says Jackson, showcases “all the various types of music that I’ve done through the years-some country, some gospel, some rockabilly, some rock n’ roll. It’s got all of that, and we threw in a Bob Dylan song ‘Thunder On the Mountain,’ just to be safe.”

The spirited Jackson, revered for such classic singles as “Let’s Have a Party” and “Fujiyama Mama,” proves that brash rock and roll attitude need not have an age limit. Her trademark growl remains intact on rockers like “Rip It Up” and “Nervous Breakdown”; she opens the set with an echo-laden sneer on a rollicking version of “Shakin’ All Over” and ends it 10 songs later with a plaintive take on Jimmie Rodgers’ “Yodel #6.” Along the way she tackles the Andrew Sisters kitschy “Rum and Coca Cola” and a big-band rendition of the DeCastro Sisters’ “Teach Me Tonight,” and she out-sasses-and out-classes-Amy Winehouse on a cover of the British bad girl’s “You Know I’m No Good,” which has already been released as a single.

The Decemberists

The King Is Dead showcases the ways in which The Decemberists–Colin Meloy, Chris Funk, Jenny Conlee, Nate Query, and John Moen–sound just as glorious in simple, stripped-down compositions as they do on the elaborate structures that have defined their work for years.

Meloy points out, however, that creating straightforward, unadorned songs can be at least as hard as building complicated musical epics. “For all my talk about how complex those records were, this one may have been harder to do,” he says. “It’s a real challenge to make simple music, and lot of times we had to deliberately hold off and keep more space. This record is an exercise in restraint.”

The album was recorded in a converted barn at Pendarvis Farm, an 80-acre estate of lush meadows, forest, and Mt. Hood views outside of Portland, and it was the concept of the barn–as recording space and as attitude–that informed the making of The King Is Dead. “We wanted that ethos,” he says. “That was the color we wanted the record to have.”

To Meloy, in some ways The King Is Dead also represents his own musical journey coming full circle. “Over the last eleven years or so, since I moved to Portland, I feel like I’ve been mining mostly English traditions for influence”, he says. “I guess I’ve kind of come back to a lot of the more American music that got me going in the first place – R.E.M. and Camper Van Beethoven and all these bands that borrowed from more American traditions like Neil Young and the Byrds.”

“Sometimes I kind of miss the epic-ness of the other albums,” he continues, “but it’s nice to get all of the information across in three minutes. It’s like going from reading a novel to reading a bunch of short stories.”

Burlesque Star of the Month is the wonderful

Talloolah Love

What is Talloolah’s Love? “Why, to create something beautiful of course!” Talloolah Love, dubbed “The Mata Hari of Burlesque,” is one of the “Glamouratti” of the modern Burlesque scene – her passion for the art of burlesque lies in the glitz and classic glamor of the 30’s and 40’s. She has a truly unique blend of raw sex appeal blended with coy undertones in the sweet spirit of “could take her home to momma if she’d only keep her clothes on” style.

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Posted by on February 1, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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